Tag Archives: Featured

Album Review: Big Nothing – Dog Hours

Bands like Big Nothing are hard to come by. I first learned of them back in 2019 and have been a fan since. Their style then was something that was just so enticing to my ears. Said release became one of my favorites and to this day is still in regular rotation.

Featuring Liz Parsons (bass/vocals), Matt Quinn (guitar/vocals), Pat Graham (guitar/vocals), and Chris Jordan (drums), Big Nothing has this distinctive charisma all in thanks to how they share vocal duties that coincides with the music they create. Their overall style, which clearly shows strong appreciation for various genres of music, results in an unique sound that teeters between indie punk and alt-country without missing a beat.

“Always On My Mind” opened up this 10-track album with an impactful yet chill song about inhibitions around courtship. I loved their regressed sound that the band managed to produce outside of traditional studio sessions all in thanks to stupid Covid.

I loved everything about “A Lot of Finding Out.” With so many proper Westerberg similarities, this track sucked me in immediately. It was personal and wholesome and catered directly to the listener.

“Still Sorta Healing,” all in thanks to Parsons, reminded me of early Juliana Hatfield in the best way. This track brought me back to the days when I shook off the grunge and started expanding on my musical tastes

The damper “Curiosity” was an alt-country stumble that truly hit at somber feelings. I’m almost afraid to know what this one was about. Truly a personal battle with the loss of great impact.

I feel the band came together the most in “Dog Hours.” This track was just great in every way. Without being overly complex, it carried a good sound throughout.

“Make Believe” had Parsons taking over lead vocals once again changing the dynamic of the album without distraction. I honestly look forward to this shift as it showcases the true talent of this band.

“Accents” just ruled. The hook on this track was so memorable it had me singing along at first listen. This track is going to get this band a lot of attention I feel. Seriously, scroll down and listen to this one.

In true alt-country form, “What I Wanna Say” closed down the album with a good story backed by harmony and twang. I loved the laughing and someone saying “done” at the end, but it just left me wanting more.

Dog Hours continued where Chris left off for listeners like myself who just simply wanted more jams from their debut. There was a clear in change in tempo and style for the benefit of the band. With a more intimate, pure sound, I feel more connected to this band. As much as I adore their debut, Dog Years is equally as impressive.

Call me corny, but they really should have called themselves Big Everything. Dog Hours without a doubt is one of my fav releases of the year.

Big Nothing links:
Bandcamp / Twitter / Instagram / Facebook / Lame-O Records

Album Review: The Decayed – Corrupt Politicians Will Never Set You Free

I am probably a little overdue for a review, so allow me to take a few moments to talk about a ripper of an album that was sent to me a couple months back by Jake from The Decayed .

I promise y’all it was listened to upon release, the delay on my end came from carving out some time to talk about it.

Hailing from South Chicago, The Decayed manage to smash punk and thrash together making for a unique, full of angst listen. The foursome are working class dudes with vocal opinions and zero filter. Their debut Corrupt Politician Will Set You Free dropped almost a year to the day, so apologies on my end for the delay of this post.

The album cover clearly has a They Live feel with a money-hungry politician surrounded by brute force that more than compensates for the album’s title. Before even listening to this, I had a feeling it was going to have tons of raw energy.

“Piece By Piece” had me slightly nervous that the back was nothing more than a Jackyl spinoff with the chainsaw, but boy I was dead wrong. These dudes just jumped right into it and got to business. Think street punk mixed with thrash and a steady bass lick keeping it all together.

“Abandon Hope” was the prominent song off this album with a powerful metal / punk collaboration enjoyable throughout. Loved the riffs on this one that tore into solitude and escape.

“Desolate” to me is what Bleeding Through would have sounded like if they skipped the metalcore and fell towards hardcore. This was a brutal track all surrounding gut feelings about propaganda and failed states.

Sounding like and angry early AFI sans emotion came “A Fire Inside”. I laugh about this one because it was not until a few minutes into writing that comparison did I line up that AFI is abbreviation for, yeah, you guessed it. Coincidence? Perhaps. The track is a good listen.

“The Old & The Dead” easily was one of my choice cuts all in thanks to angry old man punk with Matt Fremon-like bass playing. This song isn’t cookie-cutter at all and just blatantly tells you how it is and I for one appreciated the hell out of it.

“One Last Ride” was a working class, do-or-die punk rock track. I have to hand it to them, hearing “I got a perfect view of heaven from my front row seat in hell” was quite appealing to me. This wasn’t a happy-ending by any means and was more so a vision of extremities when all else is lost.

The Decayed are on the same page as Anti-Flag but far heavier. If you carry the same ideals and need something to just get your blood pumping as you question this reality built around, I’d consider checking out Corrupt Politicians Will Never Set You Free. If you are on the other side of the tracks, I hope this offends the shit out of you.

The debut was pressed on a black & white splatter LP which just looks awesome and sounds amazing when played loud. You can snag one for yourself on their Bandcamp page. It is also steaming on all of those platforms that will never pay artists what they truly deserve, except for Bandcamp. Here, I will make it easy on you, check them out:

BHP Best Of 2021 List

Oh look, the year is about up already. Guess that means it is time to drop my fav releases of yet another messed up year.

The good news about 2021 is that I went to exactly one show, but it was a great show with amazing humans all around.

Anyways, I am busy as shit with the paying gig and that dad life, so I am going to try and keep things short and sweet this year. With any luck, I will add to this some content on why these hit me the most. To be continued I suppose.

Check out the albums in no particular order that caught my attention throughout the year:

BHP BEST OF 2021 LIST

Turnstyle – Glow On

Heart Attack Man – Thoughtz & Prayerz

Lars Fredericksen – To Victory

One Step Closer – This Place You know

Johnny Dynamite and the Bloodsuckers – Sleeveless

Kali Masi – [Laughs]

Haunt – Beautiful Distraction

Neighborhood Brats – Confines of Life

Shitty Neighbors – People I Know

Heart & Lung – Twistin’ The Knife Away

Joystick – I Can’t Take It Anymore

Descendents – 9th & Walnut

Jeff Rosenstock – SKA DREAM

Lucero – When You Found Me

Jonathan Richman – Want To Visit My Inner House?

Sincere Engineer – Bless My Psyche

Juice Newson – Suburban Soul

Needles//Pins – Self-Titled

Brain Cave – Log World

Section H8 – Welcome to the Nightmare

Fiddlehead – Between The Richness

Bands: Thanks for doing what you do.

Labels & Promoters: Thanks for helping out the bands to their thing and release their music be it physical or digital and for supporting them while trying to tour in these most uncertain times. Also, thanks for the consideration when pimping them out. I am a lucky guy for this opportunity.

Finally: Thanks to YOU (yes, you). If you are even looking at this. I struggle every year if I want to keep blogging, and honestly I figure if someone out there can take some time to log in and look, then I can at least try and do my thing.

Here’s to 2022. See y’all soon.

Album Review: Heart & Lung – Twistin’ The Knife Away

Heart & Lung were one of Cleveland’s best kept punk rock secrets until that Toby guy over at Red Scare had to sign them and promote the ever-living hell out of them for all to adore.

Rightfully so though, this upbeat band rips on so many levels, is fun, and absolutely deserves the attention.

The foursome has been doing their thing for over 5 years now and just have this ability to put you in a great freaking mood. They are hilarious, but will strike your ass with their snark and style – so try not to make any eye-contact at a show (just kidding, they are super friendly folk).

Unlike any typical non-serious review I have ever done, I think it is important to share my latest dumb idea for a t-shirt for these guys to lean into what I want to say next about them:

HEART, LUNGS, & HARMONY
(This of course is done in the style of the Bone, Thugs, and Harmony logo …)

The balance these dudes carry is unreal. This is not some NOFX-bellyaching where they talk over tunes, Heart & Lung just carry an ability to combine and lead from each other’s verses without disrupting.

Anyways stupid, but rad idea – hint, hint.

The boys dropped their sophomore release titled Twistin’ The Knife Away in mid-October on Red Scare records, and it was an instant classic to my ears. Hell, Brenden Kelly said himself, “What do you kids say these days? It fucks? It slaps? It does all that stuff.” He ain’t wrong.

The album is a quick listen, but is full of tracks that are going to get stuck in your head and played over and over.

“Watch You Suffer” started off the release with a fast-paced banger for all to adore. The band has no problem holding back on this track surrounded by the best intentions for someone who clearly sucks. As much as I adore the breakdown on this one, the guitar licks are where it’s at.

“I’m Fine” is a day-to-day reminder of the things we do living in this repetitious life. Loved that they tossed in their debut album name on this, but the punky bluegrass build up was what won me over on this track. The harmonies kick in hard here to the point I have been singing this one to myself a lot lately when the day is challenging.

“Headache” was slightly toned down with good reason. I loved the emotion in this track while sitting back and realizing how aligned I am with the subject.

Loved the Blazing Saddles quote on “Shit Together”, a song the pretty much defined many of our entry to adulthood lives while stuck trying to figure things out. Damn song almost made me sad listening to it as I recalled too many parts of it in a personal aspect.

Probably one of my favorite tracks was “Never Come Home”. This song did not let up once and carried almost hidden powerful encouragement in regards to moving on when life comes down in the worst way. Maybe skip this one if you just broke up with someone recently.

“Control” was another good one that had some hints of bluegrass masked over clearly by the good stuff. This track was harmonic, yet quick and totally captured my total attention.

With 3 singers who connect on the best level, this band is incredible and entertaining to listen to. Taking queues from their previous bluegrass talent, these boys know how to steal your attention with some of the catchiest music I have heard all year. Do not take my word for it, check out Twistin’ The Knife Away and thank me later after your 20th listen.

Heart & Lung have been touring to the best of their ability lately and are opening for some band called Lagwagon in early December at the Grog Shop. Should be a good time had by all!

Heart & Lung “Watch You Suffer”

Twistin’ The Knife Away is on those streaming services, but if you really want to supposed a rad act, head over to the Red Scare Industries store and pick up a copy or 2. Tis the season to rack up credit!

Interview: Kira Roessler (Black Flag, DC3, dos)

For well over half my life, I have appreciated all things punk rock. This blogsite here really has stuck around because of that notion. I love listening to the genre, I love talking about it, and specifically I love being part of the community.

I find myself fascinated with 80s and 90s punk mostly perhaps as it was what I was solely focused on as a teen and just is a comforting reminder where I came from. I love learning of side-acts and projects from many of the members of these bands that have helped fuel my life.

A couple months back I was given an opportunity to chat with someone who I have always been a fan of since my early days of becoming obsessed with punk rock. It is no lie, she’s played in one of my favorite bands that I never was able to see back in their heyday.

Thanks to her releasing a debut solo album, Kira Roessler was available for an interview and I made sure I jumped on this opportunity.

If you have no idea who Kira is, then I will give you the high-level recap. She once was the bassist for Black Flag, but that isn’t the only think you should know. Her punk roots go pretty far back to the point Pat Smear and her were in a band called Twisted Roots.

She actually was asked to join Black Flag while she played with DC3 – Mind you, DC3 was fronted by Dez Cadena, formerly of Black Flag,.. – Anyways, she later formed a dual bass band called dos with Mike Watt soon after and dropped a few albums before moving on to other avenues in the film industry. Where not completely removing herself from music, her priorities shifted.

Throughout her musical career, she matured into a more prolific bassist which in turn just continued to impress me. Her solo album is no exception and where it has been years in the making, it is everything I would have expected to come from her.

I had a million questions I wanted to ask Kira, but also did not want to be a nuisance so toned it down some which in turn became quite a great conversation.

Check it out:


BHP: Hey Kira, not going to lie, slightly freaking out over here given your musical history and the the impact your music had on me growing up.  I must say I am so stoked to have a moment of your time and promise I am not going to just ask about Black Flag from the get go.

Instead, I’ll start off asking about MinuteFlag.  I love that EP so much although hate that the music essentially was released because of Boon’s untimely passing.  I am just curious though, how did this collaboration come together in the first place?

Kira: Wow – not many dig this deep. Well Minutemen and Black Flag were obviously label-mates on SST.  For a while Mike worked at the office at SST. I am not sure what the deciding factors were, I know the Minutemen often felt a little competitive with the other bands – they did a double album because Husker Du did one. But Black Flag was jamming pretty regularly in practice, and playing instrumental material regularly. But I do not know who suggested the joint recording. Mike and I hadn’t done the two-bass thing yet and I felt like it was hard to find space during the jams with another bass wailing away. It didn’t really come out as well as he hoped and I think that was part of why they agreed to wait until one of the bands no longer existed to release it. But I like it, it’s pretty weird.

Photo credit Rachel Roessler

BHP: Ok, now that I got that out of the way, what took you this long do something on your own terms?  Given people you have surrounded yourself with throughout your life, many who have done solo projects themselves, I’d have thought you would have done something decades ago.

K: Well I have been recording my own music in my room for many years. Building songs virtually by sending ideas to other people who then would add their parts just became a good way to operate. Since I work a lot of hours sometimes, most of my bass work happens early in the morning which is not necessarily when others want to play. So I have had a body of work (so to speak) for a while. The intention was never really to release any of it. But Kitten Robot had a label and my brother Paul approached me and said they wanted to release a record. I turned 60 this year and it was somehow the right time. It doesn’t hurt to have someone ask. I will always be making music, though, whether it is released or not. That is where the joy comes, in the creation.

BHP: In a day and age of global pandemics, I assume a lot of what was recently recorded came from constant solitude.  What was differed this time for you about recording music?  

K: Actually much of the music was recorded before the pandemic.  Working alone in my room made sense to me long before 2020. The actual final phase of polishing and mastering happened in 2021, so very little of this record had it roots in the pandemic. I did write some songs during that time… and I actually mixed and mastered a record for my favorite guitar player Glenn Brown of his songs, that I had written bass lines. This material was created virtually as well. I just tried my hand at mixing and mastering since I needed an extra project during the pandemic. 

BHP: Your debut is very intimate and carries experimental vibes throughout.  When you started recording this did you have an idea of where you were headed, or was this more of a “let’s see where this takes me?”

K: My music always tends to be very personal. I am moved to write from a feeling or idea that comes from inside, and I try to capture it with my bass and then my voice. This particular group of songs tells a story – it is chronological – so I did not know exactly where I was heading because it was written across time as things were happening.

BHP: Who was “The Ghosts” about?  I really enjoyed that one and figured I would at least ask.

K: “The Ghosts” captures the story of the record the best in a way. It is a story about love and loss. “The Ghosts” was written at a time when I was facing a loss and all the losses that had come before in my life came into my head and heart like ghosts… appearing to torment me just as I was facing this new pain … 

BHP: Your brother helped with producing this release and dropped it on his label, Kitten Robot Studios.  It absolutely kills me by the way that he more or less hung out with Darby Crash and Pat Smear in high school by the way.  Anyways, what was it like to work so closely with him when putting things together?  

K: Paul and I have a very close relationship. We have been in bands together and gone through this long journey together. But working on my songs at Kitten Robot Studio I feel that our collaboration has grown a great deal. Paul’s music tends to be very lush and layered and it doesn’t necessarily come naturally to him to leave the spaces. I am quite the opposite. So he will help me with ideas of layers to add, and I will strip away things I feel are using up too much space. It’s a dance. On my songs, he gives me ultimate decision making so in a way – he just works hard to facilitate what I am trying to do. He is an excellent producer in that way. His goal is to help people achieve their vision.

BHP: Do you think you’ll do a small tour to support this release?  

K: I do not have any plans to tour. I do not have any plans to play live. I will say that I am trying to find a way to share something, some kind of event, but I have not but a vague concept so far. 

Photo Credit: Jack Grisham

BHP: One thing I really have admired about you is once you parted ways from the L.A. punk scene, you started experimenting with sound in dos first from a far and then in person, contributed to some of the most essential releases in various ways.  and then managed to become a dialogue editor and sound editor.  How were you able to accomplish off of this?  Did you make any sacrifices to take leaps towards any goals you may have had?

K: Of course it can feel, at times, like it is a sacrifice having to put my musical life to the side in order to make a living… but the truth is that I have been nothing but lucky.

When Mike and I thought about having a two bass band – we were very clear that for us to have the space we needed, there needed to be no other instruments. I learned a lot during dos about leaving holes and spaces and also how to find the spaces in order to add something. It became my preferred sound or style, not to have everything on top of each other. My tastes became stripped down, because I could hear the emotion better. And after all, I love music when the people playing are felling something and then I get to feel it too. That became the goal. 

In terms of work, I studied computers at UCLA and then became a computer programmer to support myself after college. But working in the corporate world was kind of miserable for me. I am a non-conformist and the corporate world insists on conformity. I felt like an oddball the whole time. Then I met a guy by chance through Paul who was doing sound for a USC student film. Paul was composing for it and I played some bass. I became enamored with the idea of using my musical background and my computer background to work in sound editing for television or film. I twisted the guy’s arm to hire me and answered phones and did admin work until I could learn the skills I needed to contribute in sound. Just lucky – because it is work that suits me very well.

BHP: Luck or not, I am sure it was not easy, can you tell me about some challenges you overcame?

K: Well of course the biggest challenge is to achieve some kind of balance. To make a lot of music, work on a lot of great projects – but there are only so many hours in the day. I go through times when it is very hard to find time to create music because work is challenging. And I am not a prolific song writer. I go through very dry periods when the ideas just don’t come, or the ability to translate the ideas feels stuck. But I try very hard to just appreciate what I have – recognize how lucky I am, and not focus on what isn’t happening at any given time.

BHP: Clearly you have so many stories about your life from the mid-80s onward.  Have you ever thought about maybe writing an auto-biography?

K: I find writing to be a pretty challenging type of work. It does not feel natural, especially to blather on about myself. Then there is the problem of having to remember all those fascinating details that I should remember. And actually my life before the 80s had some pretty cool stuff too!!

BHP: If you could regroup with one band you played with in the past, which would be be and why?

K: Interesting question. Like go back in time? Or like the re-hash thing where groups re-form after years off and do a record or tour? The truth is that for me, the idea of re-creating something years after the fact is less appealing than doing new music and moving forward.  I do not regret any of the time I spent in any band … but that doesn’t mean I want to revisit them. For me there is always the journey forward, with new things to say, and potentially new people to say them with. So … I got nothing.

BHP: You know, I wanted to follow-up here and just say regroup with any band you ever played with and for the sake of nostalgic purposes, but I get what you are saying and understand sometimes dripping back isn’t as purposeful as looking ahead.

Finally, probably one of the more important questions.  You said in your bio you are a dog mom.  Tell me about your pups.

K: I currently have 3 rescued dogs … all seniors 14, 12, and 10 years old. They are 20 pounds and under, as I live in a 2 bedroom condo. For them, there is room to run if the mood strikes them. The oldest, Jim is in some ways the most active. But he has gone almost completely deaf … which is hard for him.

Hank, the middle child, is the problem child. He has bitten my husband and I on more than one occasion. Generally speaking he feels that he is under attack at times and those are dangerous times indeed. He is 15 pounds of fury in those moments. Luckily they are relatively rare.

Our youngest is our female, nicknamed Stinky … the reason is probably self-evident. She is a sweetheart, very calm and loving… she just prefers to wear a layer of yuck if she is able to find one. But we (my husband and I) love them all dearly.  I never had kids – so my dogs give me that opportunity to nurture and care for a being who loves me unconditionally (most of the time).

BHP: Thanks for your time.  I enjoyed the release a lot!

K: Thank you, and I am glad you enjoyed the listen.


Kira, the debut solo album by Kira was released on 19-OCT-2021 on Kitten Robot Records. Check out the video below for the song “The Ghosts”: